All posts by DDT Blog∫ter

Our new eStore… Homepage #3

With our last segment touring our new homepage, we will quickly cover the footer section.

We previously mentioned on the first day of our tour of the homepage, that several items that were previously available on our main menubar have been moved to the footer section.  Let’s go over each of these sections quickly,

Continue reading Our new eStore… Homepage #3

Our new eStore design… the Homepage #1

In the last week, you may have noticed some changes to our eStore.   Over the past year, we’ve been working hard with a designer to implement some MUCH needed changes to our eStore.  Our first goal was to bring our eStore up to current standards by providing a mobile-friendly version.  While doing so, we felt it was also time to refresh the overall site and prep it for some new features we’ve had on our goal list at the same time.

We are so excited to see this hard work to launch!

Over the next several weeks we will take you on a tour of the new eStore some of the many features that have been added, including the new mobile site.  You will find this tour here but also in our weekly newsletter (psst, our newsletter will also soon receive a slight redesign to match the new site)

So let’s get started, today we will tackle the redesigned header and menu bar.

 

 

Continue reading Our new eStore design… the Homepage #1

Using Primary Sources to Teach About Our Nation’s Beginning

Primary sources are artifacts, documents, or any other source of information created at the time under study. They provide records of the period of time in which they were created.

They take many formats:

  • manuscripts
  • photographs
  • audio or video recordings
  • journals, diaries, and letters
  • speeches
  • political cartoons
  • newspaper articles
  • advertisements
  • government documents
  • and more!

These valuable resources engage students in a meaningful way, resulting in a deeper understanding of past events. By analyzing primary sources, students gain greater insight into what it was like to live during the period of time in which the materials were created.

Common Core State Standards (CCSS)

Inquiry into primary sources helps students achieve the following standards set forth in the CCSS, which places an emphasis on informational text:

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies.

Continue reading Using Primary Sources to Teach About Our Nation’s Beginning

New Products for March 2018

Look what’s new from our publishers.

Carson Dellosa Publishing – 36 new titles

Carson Dellosa Publishing just keeps pouring out amazing titles.  This month we have the next installment in the monthly teacher resource, a new series called Math Workshop, new additions to the Guided Reading series and then a major refresh and update to the ever popular Math 4 Today and Language Arts 4 Today series.  Make sure you check out these new titles from one of your preferred publishers!


Teacher Created Materials – 28new titles

Last month Teacher Created Materials released a wide variety of titles, such as destinations and science titles plus much more.  This month they released many of the same titles in Spanish.  So be sure to check out these titles.

Continue reading New Products for March 2018

New Products for February 2018

Look what’s new from our publishers.

Carson Dellosa Publishing – 35 new titles

Carson Dellosa Publishing just keeps pouring out amazing titles.  This month we saw titles for the current month and then a variety of titles from Math, Science, Brain activities to Writing.  Make sure you check out these new titles from one of your preferred publishers!


Teacher Created Materials – 21 new titles

href=”http://www.dedicatedteacher.com/p/TCM/”>

Teacher Created Materials released a wide variety of titles, such as destinations,  Science topics, Wild Life, machinery and much much more.   Be sure to check out these titles jam-packed with illustrations and learning activities.


S&S Learning – 4 new titles

Are you ready for the Winter Olympics?  It’s almost here and S&S Learning has released four new titles to help you and your students learn more about the Olympic games.  Learn about Canadian Olympians, the 2018 Pyeong Chang games and South Korea.  Check out these wonderful resources and tap into the excitement that only comes once ever four years! Continue reading New Products for February 2018

Teaching Figurative Language and Story Elements in the Elementary and Middle Grades

Literary techniques are the constructions of language used by an author to convey meaning. These techniques make the story more interesting to the reader. It is important that students learn to identify and understand these constructions. The mastering of these devices will help students get more enjoyment from the fiction they read—both in and out of the classroom situation.

These literary devices are commonly taught in the elementary and middle grades: Connotation, Dialogue, Dialect, Imagery, Idiom, Simile, Metaphor, Pun, Personification, Hyperbole, Understatement, Allusion, Oxymoron, Symbol, Alliteration, and Onomatopoeia.

Many of these devices fall into the category of figurative language. Figurative language uses figures of speech—phrases that go beyond the literal meaning of the words—to be more effective. Figures of speech include metaphors, similes, idioms, and hyperbole.

The study of the elements of a story goes hand in hand with the study of literary devices. The basic elements of a story are character, setting, plot, setting, and theme. Also important are point of view, tone, mood, and style.

The inclusion of figurative language in a work of literature enhances the various elements of the story. It improves a reader’s enjoyment and understanding of the literary work in several ways:

1. Figurative language helps create a mood, which refers to the atmosphere that surrounds the reader and evokes certain feelings.

2. Figurative language can enhance characterization. It can help the author reveal the characters’ traits and personality.

3. Figurative language can help the author advance or slow down the plot. The author can slow down the plot by adding long descriptive passages. He or she can use figurative language to add suspense or humor to the plot.

4. Figurative language can make the setting come alive.

In other words, the use of figurative language enriches the reader’s experience by making the text more interesting.

Figurative Language and Other Literary Devices

Figurative Language and Other Literary Devices, written by Rebecca Stark and published by Educational Books ’n’ Bingo, is available in two grade levels: Grades 5–8 and Grades 3–6. They use examples from classic and modern literature to teach these techniques and devices.

The following literary devices and techniques are covered: • Connotation,
• Dialogue
• Dialect
• Imagery
• Idiom
• Simile
• Metaphor
• Allusion
• Personification
• Hyperbole
• Understatement
• Irony (Grades 5–8 only)
• Sarcasm (Grades 5–8 only)
• Oxymoron
• Paradox (Grades 5–8 only)
• Symbol
• Pun
• Alliteration
• Onomatopoeia.

At the end of the unit, students will be able to identify and understand these literary devices. They will also be able to use the figurative language and other literary techniques in their own writing.

Format

Each literary device is defined. One or more examples are given from classic and/or modern literature. Students are then given opportunities to identify, explain, and use the technique.

Story Elements

Story Elements, written by Rebecca Stark and published by Educational Books ’n’ Bingo, is available in two grade levels: Grades 5–8 and Grades 3–6. They use examples from classic and modern literature to teach the elements of literature.

It is important that students learn to analyze and interpret the literature they read—not only for good results on standardized tests but also for enjoyment throughout their lives. To get the most out of what they read, they should be able to analyze a work’s literary elements. These books are designed to help students achieve that goal.

The books cover the following elements:
• Plot and Conflict
• Character
• Setting
• Point of View
• Tone
• Mood
• Style
• Theme
• Genre.

At the end of the unit, students will be able to…
• infer the setting of a story
• understand the devices and word choices that help develop the mood of a story
• understand the devices and word choices that help develop the tone of a story
• understand the elements of plot
• understand the characters in a story
• infer the characteristics and qualities of the main characters in a story
• identify the point of view and narrative voice of the story
• determine the mood of a story
• determine the tone of a story
• determine the style of a story
• identify the theme of a story
• identify the genre of a story
• understand and develop story elements in their own writing.

Format

Each literary element is defined. One or more examples are given from classic and/or modern literature. Skill-building activities based on the literary element are provided.

Other Resources

Educational Books ’n’ Bingo’s Figurative Language Bingo Book and Elements of Literature Bingo Book provide practice and review of these concepts. Each book provides a complete bingo game in a book. There are enough unique bingo sheets for 30 students!

Barbara Peller, AKA Rebecca Stark, author of Figurative Language and Other Literary Devices, Story Elements, Figurative Language Bingo Book, and Elements of Literature Bingo Book.

The books described in this article are published by Educational Books ’n’ Bingo.

Logic Puzzles Help Build Deductive-Reasoning Skills

Logic is the systematic reasoning process we use to comprehend the relationships between facts in order to reach conclusions. Logical thinking enables students to understand what they read and what they are told and helps them see relationships, understand sequencing, and make inferences. Students with good logical-thinking skills can take new information to build upon what they already know. Outside of the classroom logical thinking can help improve social skills.

Logical reasoning comprises two opposite types of thinking: deductive and inductive. Deductive reasoning begins with a general statement. When we use deductive reasoning, we begin with a general statement. We then examine specific premises to infer a conclusion. If all the premises are true, then the reasoning will be sound. Inductive reasoning, on the other hand, uses specific observations to make a generalization. Inductive thinking may result in a correct conclusion, but it is not reliable.

Example of Deductive Thinking
Premise 1. A dog is a mammal.
Premise 2. All mammals are warm-blooded animals.
Conclusion: Dogs are warm-blooded animals.
This conclusion is valid, and because the premises are correct, it is also true. Continue reading Logic Puzzles Help Build Deductive-Reasoning Skills

New Products for January 2018

Look what’s new from our publishers!

Bellwether Media – 71 new titles

Bellwether Media was hard at work this fall introducing new series to their collection and adding new titles to existing series.  New series such as: Brands We KnowInsects Up CloseFarm AnimalsCommunity HelpersBlastoff DiscoveryCountry ProfilesTorqueFive SensesOcean Life Up CloseNorth American AnimalsSeasonsMighty Machines and Celebrating Holidays.  Titles jam packed with ideas to help your students learn while keeping their interest with topics that interest them.  Be sure to have a look at these wonderful new titles.


Gallopade International – 56 new titles

Gallopade added a new series to their “Our State” collections of products.  This new series is called “Interactive Notebook: A Hands-On Approach to Learning About Our State!” With titles for every state in the U.S.  This new edition/series gives up to 21 different titles all geared toward each state.  To check out all the titles for your home state, click here, then scroll through this new series and find your state.  Click on that product and then just below the cover image on the product page, click on “View all in series”.  There you will find ALL the resources Gallopade provides for your state.  If you need assistance please contact customer service, they will be happy to provide a link!


Continue reading New Products for January 2018